Thursday, February 16, 2012

Vagina Monologues empowers women, encourages discussion

Annual event increases awareness on gender issues

By Alex Domine, A&E Reporter

Actresses in Pacific Lutheran University’s production of the Vagina Monologues confronted the taboo of discussing womanhood.

The Vagina Monologues is sponsored annually by the Women’s Center and took place Feb. 9-11 in Eastvold Auditorium.

“I wanted to participate in order to help spread the word that not only is it okay to talk about gender issues but it's also important to do so,” said actress in the Vagina Monologues senior Julia Rodriguez.

The Vagina Monologues is a series of soliloquies each with a different message about women’s rights. The production aims to encourage discussion on issues of social justice by portraying women on stage recounting their experiences in oppression. Each monologue has a different theme.

“They’re topics we don’t discuss everyday in society,” said junior Katie Sollinger. “It’s a good way to educate people on race, violence sexual assault discrimination."

Talking about vaginas is hard for the actresses.

“I tried to imagine that I was talking and joking with a few of my friends,” said Rodriguez.

It is in conjunction with the V-Day Movement, a campaign that seeks to end violence against women and girls.

The Vagina Monologues was written by women’s rights activist Eve Ensler and is translated into more than 40 different languages and performed in more than 140 countries.

Sollinger said the Vagina Monologues reaches a substantial number of people.

“It’s really uplifting not only for women, it’s for parents, kids, high-school students, family members and men,” she said.

Senior Amanda Davis has attended the Vagina Monologues since she's been to PLU.

“I feel really empowered being a woman [after watching],” said Davis.

Davis said that it is always uncomfortable during the performance, especially during the darker scenes.

Each actress had her own motivations for doing the monologues.

"I enjoy discussing and educating people on issues of social justice issues and oppression,” said Sollinger. “Everyone leaves knowing something more from when they came in.”


The Vagina Monologues is sponsored annually by the Women’s Center and took place Feb. 9-11 in Eastvold Auditorium.

“I wanted to participate in order to help spread the word that not only is it okay to talk about gender issues but it's also important to do so,” said actress in the Vagina Monologues senior Julia Rodriguez.

The Vagina Monologues is a series of soliloquies each with a different message about women’s rights. The production aims to encourage discussion on issues of social justice by portraying women on stage recounting their experiences in oppression. Each monologue has a different theme.

“They’re topics we don’t discuss everyday in society,” said junior Katie Sollinger. “It’s a good way to educate people on race, violence sexual assault discrimination."

Talking about vaginas is hard for the actresses.

“I tried to imagine that I was talking and joking with a few of my friends,” said Rodriguez.

It is in conjunction with the V-Day Movement, a campaign that seeks to end violence against women and girls.

The Vagina Monologues was written by women’s rights activist Eve Ensler and is translated into more than 40 different languages and performed in more than 140 countries.

Sollinger said the Vagina Monologues reaches a substantial number of people.

“It’s really uplifting not only for women, it’s for parents, kids, high-school students, family members and men,” she said.

Senior Amanda Davis has attended the Vagina Monologues since she's been to PLU.

“I feel really empowered being a woman [after watching],” said Davis.

Davis said that it is always uncomfortable during the performance, especially during the darker scenes.

Each actress had her own motivations for doing the monologues.

"I enjoy discussing and educating people on issues of social justice issues and oppression,” said Sollinger. “Everyone leaves knowing something more from when they came in.”